What’s next with security and cloud? Can the channel benefit?

Danny Yeowell, Security and Networking Business Unit Manager at Avnet

Danny Yeowell, Security and Networking Business Unit Manager at Avnet

Cloud. Security. Two words that can polarise debate as some channel leaders see opportunity while others see issues and for every cloud sceptic there is a cloud convert.  All too often the debate is about how secure is “cloud” whereas the focus should really be on understanding what it has to offer and how it can support an organisation’s business priorities.

The likelihood is that your customers are already utilising cloud-based services in one form or another.  According to research by Cloud Security Alliance, customer relationship management (CRM) represents the most widely adopted cloud-based solution with over 36% of companies having made the migration. The survey further highlighted that 64.9% of IT leaders think the cloud is as secure or more secure than on-premises software. This finding contrasts significantly with a global survey conducted for BT in 2014, which revealed that more than three quarters of IT decision makers (82 percent in the US; 76 percent globally) said security was their main concern about using cloud-based services.

Whilst confidence is growing, customers should not feel compelled to make the giant leap to the cloud. Public cloud isn’t a panacea and it’s important for organisations to understand their options when developing a cloud strategy. Not all data is equal and this fact is paramount when deciding where it resides. Just like traditional storage and data sharing methods, cloud computing comes with its own set of characteristics that introduce a new set of risks. Data governance is one of the primary concerns when moving to the cloud as organisations relinquish some control over their data. New assurances are needed to ensure that organisational security policies and legal obligations continue to be met.

Cloud computing offers organisations many significant benefits including:

  • Flexibility
  • Accessibility
  • Potential cost savings
  • Increased capacity.

Organisations can maximise these benefits by understanding the implications of handing over their data to a third party and by assessing the additional risks that this move creates.  Once these risks are identified, organisations can ensure that the necessary controls are in place to enable them to meet their information security and data governance objectives.

A move to the cloud has challenges and this presents an opportunity for the channel. For every organisation keen to dive head first into a cloud only environment, there will be others wanting to adopt a more considered approach and explore private or hybrid cloud environments. Every organisation has a different tolerance to risk and the channel is best placed to help them select the optimal solution that delivers the benefits of cloud computing whilst mitigating threats with the most secure solution.

Danny Yeowell has 30 years’ experience within the IT industry working for manufacturers and systems integrators.  The past 20 years’ experience has been gained within the solutions and pre-sales environment across many market sectors.  Yeowell has a breadth of knowledge spanning networking, security, data centre and unified communications, among other associated technology and service areas. 

 

Posted under Cloud Computing, IT infrastructure, Security

This post was written by on November 22, 2016

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How is the channel following through on its vision for 2016?

At the beginning of this year, we laid out our top predictions for technology trends in the channel for 2016. As we reach the half way point of the calendar year, it’s time to recap and see how things are shaping up so far:

Marcus Adae, Vice President Strategic Suppliers, Avnet Technology Solutions EMEA

Marcus Adae, Vice President Strategic Suppliers,
Avnet Technology Solutions EMEA

#1: Mobility for channel enablement

Mobility is moving more towards app-driven enablement, this much we know to be true. Mobile apps are becoming the norm for any kind of customer interaction, thanks to more personalised engagement through analytics and Internet of Things (IoT) data. However, what we’re seeing so far is that enterprise infrastructure is an even more important driver for the channel and partners in the mobility space. Read More…

Posted under Big data, BYOD; celebrating mobility, Cloud Computing, Converged infrastructure, Internet of Things (IoT), Security

Effective security is more than an insurance policy – it’s a business enabler

Christian Curtis, sales director at Avnet Technology Solutions UK takes a look at how to sell the business benefits of IT security

Security is vital; the threat landscape has evolved beyond lone hackers or small groups breaching networks. Cyber crime is organised, it is big business and has spawned a huge underground economy. Attacks are often targeted, sophisticated and inherently malicious.

We understand and recognize that security is essential and that not everyone who wants to access a corporate network has good intentions, however, the doom mongering can be overwhelming. Security solution companies and channel partners could and should adopt a more positive approach to selling IT security. It is not an easy task and regular stories in the industry and by the media around high profile breaches tend to reinforce the fear and dread message in people’s minds. That said, selling security only on the merits of negativity seems counter-productive and unnecessary.

Read More…

Posted under IT infrastructure, Security

Our vision for technology in 2016

Dieter Lott, Vice President, Business Development, EMEA, shares how we see 2016 shaping up in terms of technology trends.


Dieter Lott Avnet Technology Solutions EMEA

Dieter Lott, Vice President Business Development EMEA, Avnet Technology Solutions

#1: Mobility for channel enablement


Mobile interactions are continuing to evolve. There’s a massive shift in the mobile space with apps becoming the norm for any kind of customer interaction. Downloading apps is now a normal ask of customers. In 2016, this will open up new solution areas for channel partners as mobility moves more towards app-driven channel enablement where partners can communicate, receive and access information through easy-to-use apps.

Value-added distributors can help here by offering their expertise, such as mobile app development, to enhance the skills of their partners. In the vertical markets this is all the more essential as growth in those segments is driven by customer engagement which can be achieved through personalised experiences generated by the merging analytics, mobile apps and Internet of Things (IoT) data.

Read More…

Posted under Big data, BYOD; celebrating mobility, Internet of Things (IoT)

This post was written by on January 13, 2016

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Organisations should be adopting a new proactive approach to security breaches

Dieter Lott Avnet Technology Solutions EMEA

Dieter Lott, Vice President Business Development EMEA, Avnet Technology Solutions

IT infrastructure is in a constant state of change, and nowhere is this more evident than in the Security and Networking marketplace. New dynamics such as ‘Bring Your Own Device’ (BYOD) and hybrid computing trends are creating bigger security challenges for businesses as working cultures become more mobile. We’re seeing that the traditional methods of data protection are no longer enough as larger companies become increasingly subject to high profile data breaches, and cyber attacks become more calculated. Businesses of every size are slowly waking up to the principle that it’s no longer a case of ‘if’ you’re breached but ‘when’. Therefore, it is essential for any IT strategy to adopt a modern proactive approach to security breaches that takes into account business intelligence.

Traditionally, data breaches were seen to be the cause of external sources, and security efforts were designed to keep threats out by building walls around an organisation’s data. However, the requirements of an enterprise’s security solution are changing rapidly. The adoption of private, hybrid and public cloud solutions has allowed businesses to store their applications and information in a variety of places, all of which need addressing and securing. Therefore as businesses’ infrastructures become more complex to manage, insider threats become increasingly common.

These transformations are creating security gaps, and companies are facing the challenge of how to secure applications and devices in a way that’s not overly disruptive to the user but also provides the right level of corporate security. As companies adopt cloud solutions and broaden their network scope, they also begin to struggle with how to meet security compliance demands without sacrificing network availability. Users are also putting pressure on enterprise networks as they increasingly embrace mobile working practices. This level of flexibility increases the pressure on perimeter security, as users drive a greater volume of traffic onto the network by accessing services from multiple locations.

To move forward, organisations need to understand that breaches will very likely still happen, and it’s essential to have the right system and processes in place to manage an event once it’s happened. The modern approach to network security is all about the intelligence you have on your environment and the speed with which you can respond to a threat. The secret to which is using forensics and analytics to track a breach when it happens, and allow network managers to understand the damage that has been done  and find the person who has committed the offence.

In order to close the security gaps, businesses need network security solutions that give complete visibility and do more than just alert you to breaches. I believe the next generation of security software will evolve to operate in constant learning mode and be able to adapt to the strategies of potential threats in real time. There are a number of products and services already in existence in the market to help organisations manage such an event, and businesses should be looking to adopt a range of security solutions that can offer holistic support before, during and after a security breach.

There is much more focus now on the analytics of what’s happening in the network, how it’s happening and the forensics of ‘something’ has happened – what’s the damage that’s been done?’ These technologies can help businesses to plug the security intelligence gap which will enable them to move from a ‘defensive’ approach to one that’s ‘proactive’, to limit and prevent damage from security breaches – today and tomorrow.

Posted under BYOD; celebrating mobility, IT Software