The Software-Defined Data Centre Explained: Part II of II

Steve Phillips, CIO, Avnet Inc.

In part one of this article, we examined how data centres have evolved, and why current solutions are leaving some businesses searching for what they believe is the next evolution in data centre architecture: the software defined data centre (SDDC).

In this post we’ll examine how soon SDDC’s may become a reality, what obstacles are holding it back, and identity a few of the vendors to watch out for as SDDC becomes a reality.

HOW PROMISING AND HOW SOON?

According to Gartner’s Hype Cycle for 2014, the SDDC—part of what they refer to as “software-defined anything,” or SDA/SDX—is still firmly in the Cycle’s first stage, where the promise of technology has yet to be grounded in the context of real-world application.

That hasn’t stopped Gartner from calling software-defined anything “one of the top IT trends with the greatest possible impact on an enterprise’s infrastructure and operations,” according to Computer Weekly.

EARLY OBSTACLES TO ADOPTION

While the potential for SDDC may be great, embracing it is more of a revolution than an evolution. The migration to a virtualized environment could be embraced by traditional data centres as time, budget and business need allowed, with virtualized racks next to traditional hardware racks.

On the other hand, software-defined data centres require common APIs to operate: the hardware can be pooled and controlled by software or it can’t. As a result, companies with significant legacy infrastructures may find it difficult to adopt SDDC in their own environments.

One way for existing data centres to avoid the “all or nothing” approach of SDDC is by embracing what Gartner began referring to as “bimodal IT” in 2014. Bimodal IT identifies two types of IT needs:

  • Type 1 is traditional IT, which places a premium on stability and efficiency for mission-critical infrastructure needs.
  • Type 2 refers to a more agile environment focused on speed, scalability, time-to-market, close alignment with business needs, and rapid evolution.

A bimodal IT arrangement would allow large legacy IT operations to establish a separate SDDC-driven environment to meet business needs that call for fast, scalable and agile IT resources, while continuing to rely on traditional virtualized environments for applications and business needs that value uptime and consistency above all else.

Over time, more resources could be devoted to the new SDDC architecture as the needs of the business evolve, without requiring the entire data centre to convert to SDDC all at once.

WHAT VENDORS ARE LEADING THE SDDC CHARGE?

Given how different software-defined data centre architectures are from traditional and virtualized environments, it’s a golden opportunity for new and emerging vendors to gain a first-mover advantage on some of the entrenched data centre giants.

APIs: The critical components of SDDC are the APIs that control the pooled resources. OpenStack’s API is the open source market leader at this point, since many vendors currently rely on their own proprietary APIs to control their hardware.

Computing & Storage: Emerging players like Nimble Storage and Nutanix are at the forefront of the SDDC movement, but data centre incumbents like IBM, HP, Dell, NetApp, Cisco and EMC are right there with them.

Networking: While Cisco, Juniper and HP are certainly the focus of the software defined networking space, startups like Big Switch and Cumulus Networks are gaining significant market interest, funding and traction as the SDDC model gains momentum.

Converged Infrastructure: Two additional initiatives worth keeping an eye on are VCE and their VBlock solutions, as well as NetApp’s Flexpods integrated infrastructure solutions. These products are designed to meet the needs of both “clean sheet” and legacy IT environments interested in pursuing the bimodal IT approach.

So while the reality of the SDDC may be a few years away for many IT environments with considerable legacy investments, it’s certainly a new and compelling vision for the data centre.

More importantly, it appears to be the solution IT is looking for in the always on, mission critical, cloud-ready and data-rich environment we operate in today. Expect to hear more on this topic in future Behind the Firewall blog posts.

Posted under Storage, Virtualisation